#
Museum of Northwest Colorado
Craig Daily Press Stories

Little Jack Steffen started playing the tuba at a very young age.  His family spent many Saturday evenings gathered around singing and playing musical instruments.   That is a sharp contrast from the way most families spend Saturday evenings now, in front of some form of screen, whether TV, computer or hand-held device.  Click on the title to read more about Jack.

Early homesteaders in Moffat County had no time or taste for racial prejudice - or so it appeared.  Read about an emancipated slave and her life as a homesteader in rural Williams Fork  area, by clicking on the link in the title above.

Craig's own fighter, Frankie Russell poses with his trainer and another boxer.  Click on the title "Craig's Brawny Boxer" to read the full story about this local boxer.

Spend a Saturday with Sally and her dog on a special day in Craig's history.   Click on the title link to read the story. 

Read about an early contest in Craig that delighted all the schoolchildren.  Click on the title to read.

Though it would be considered inhumane today, the downtown merchants hosted a turkey toss for several years in an effort to attract out-of-town holiday shoppers.  Click on the title link to read more.   

Take a look at the changes in the area now called Shadow Mountain, and how newcomers then and now still shape our local history.  Click on the title to read the story. Photos at left show Merrill a homesteader around 1903 and a new breed of homesteaders who came to Shadow Mountain over 70 years later, also intent on building.

Homes built in Mt. Harris around 1915 were moved when the mine closed forty years later to various locations throughout the valley.  "Repurposing" older buildings is the part of any community, and Craig has a number of such structures located throughout town and the area.  Read the whole story here.

Bonnie Clifton shares a humorous story (at least funny now, 50 years later) about how she came to live in the old Congregational Church parsonage after its move to Russell Street.

Class rings are one of the most sentimental items to be found in a dresser drawer or jewelry case.  The museum loves to hear stories about the rings, and the people who wore them.  Read more by clicking on this link. 

The railroad into Craig, known as the Moffat Road, was traveled by tough engines that could take the brutal climbs and long grades of the Yampa Valley tracks.  Learn more about these Mikado engines and the line they served for so many decades by clicking on the link in the title above.   

Click on the title to read how one family has carried on the hard work and community pride of their homestead ancestors.

For years, the Craig depot was of the hub downtown district and the lifeline for goods coming  in and going out from town, as well as passengers traveling between Craig and Denver.  Learn more about the history of the train's service to our region and the depot that served the community for over 70 years by clicking on the link in the title. 

High school shop classes used to build homes, garages and other structures during their class times.   Click on the link on the title to read more about these homes. 

A boy raised out on the Williams Fork made it big in the 1950s when he won a local talent contest and went to Hollywood for an audition.  To read more, click on the title link. 

These ladies, once newcomers to the area, stayed and became great contributors to the growing little frontier town of Craig.  Click on the title to learn more about how newcomers and oldtimers have a place in our history. 

Big box stores are nothing new.  Click on the title to read the history of Safeway stores in Craig, and how they affected our other stores.

The baby boom following World War II caused a housing and classroom crunch in Craig in the 1950s.  To read about the changes that happened in our town then, click on the title above. 

This mystery has never been solved.  Read about a live ammunition found buried in a Craig neighborhood street in the 1950s.  Click on the title link to read more. 

Fireworks are a highlight of summer in Craig.  Read about early celebrations of this favorite summer-time holiday.    Click on the titel to read more.....  

Find out about the cowboy 'foodies' that rode that range over 100 years ago! Click on the title to read more......

Born in Calhan, Colorado, about 30 miles northeast of Colorado Springs, in 1917, William B. Nelson entered the Colorado School of Mines after completing high school. In 1939 he came to Craig and was involved in hauling petroleum.

Click on "Jovial Giant" to read the full article on Jim Brinks.

Click to read more about Conway Irick.

Click on the title to read more about Russell Miller.

Wally Cline  -  Overcoming PTSD in the 1940s.

Click on "Recovering from the Great War" to read more.

Craig just kept drawing this guy back.... click on the title above and read more about Woody Herring.

Great salesmanship took this genial World War II veteran far in Craig in the 1950s and 60s. Click on the title above to read more.

Still getting around town, Bob Nicodemus is still a familiar face around Craig, as he was in 1956 when cartoonist Chet Klock featured him in a newspaper column.  Click on the title above to read more.

Fred ran a great hardware store for a number of years.  Click on the title to read more.

Ray brought in good lumber for Craig's burgeoning building surge.  Click the title above to read more.

A whole family went to work to keep the town clean!  Click on the title above to read more.

Besides starting a family business that has spanned over six decades, Pete Mathers began free Christmas dinners for the community - a tradition that is carried on today.  Click on the title to read more.

George Heintz loved tinkering with the machinery on his parents' homestead which led him into his chosen career in Craig.  To read more click on the title!

Chuck Crosthwaite ran the local dairy in the 1950s, keeping it open into the early 1970s.  Local milk and cream from local farms and ranches was transformed into products which went into the local grocery stores.  How local can it get?!  Click on the title to read more.

Hugh Jones was so involved with his business and his committment to community endeavors, that the standing joke was even his wife Margaret had to schedule time to see him! Click on the link to read more about this energetic Craig businessman.

From distributor for CD Smith Drug Company and then C&H Beer Company, Ed Harding's energetic personality propelled him into serving as the region's state representative, as a Democrat. Click on the link to read more.

Merlin Gearhart, owner of the local Dodge-Plymouth auto agency in Craig in the mid-1950s, loved working on the cars as much as selling them.  Click on the link to read more.

Avid outdoorsman, Mark Maurin, ran a variety type hardware store in Craig for over twenty years. Click the link to read more.

Guaranteed to please, Leonard emphazied great customer service at his filling station.  Click on the link to read more.

Still remembered fondly as a man with a dry sense of humor, Archie Seals ran a dry cleaning business in Craig for many years.

Nic Nicoletto knew his way around in the woods as well as he did the kitchen.  He was Craig's #1 chef for many years, but also was an expert bow hunter. Click on the title to read more.

There was an auto parade in Craig, down Yampa Avenue, in 1915, to celebrate the 4th of July.  The festivities included fireworks, ball games and all sorts of races and activities.  Click on "Fireworks and Children's Faces" to read this story.

Ed Johnson, Moffat County homesteader, served as governor of Colorado in the mid 20th century years.  Click on the title "A Colorado Governor Goes to Hollywood" to read the story.

Camping has been a perennial favorite for the populace of Northwestern Colorado since the first homesteaders trickled in in the late 1880s.  The personal trappings may have changed over the century, but lumpy sleeping bags, bugs, crisp nights and fresh mornings remain the same.  Click on the title above the photo to read about what makes our area so special for outdoor adventure.

Harvest time has always brought variable results in Northwest Colorado.  Read more by clicking on the title......

Museum of Northwest Colorado
590 Yampa Ave.
Craig, CO 81625
Phone: 970-824-6360
Email: musnwco@moffatcounty.netmusnwco@moffatcounty.net

Open year round 
Monday thru Friday 9:00-5:00 Saturday 10:00 - 4:00
Admission Free - Donations Gladly Accepted
Museum is wheelchair accessible